The Two Falcons

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The Two Falcons

 

Once there was a king who received a gift of two magnificent falcons from Arabia. They were peregrine falcons, the most beautiful birds he had ever seen. He gave the precious birds to his head falconer to be trained.

Months passed and one day the head falconer informed the king that though one of the falcons was flying majestically, soaring high in the sky, the other bird had not moved from its branch since the day it had arrived.

The king summoned healers and sorcerers from all the land to tend to the falcon, but no one could make the bird fly. He presented the task to the member of his court, but the next day, the king saw through the palace window that the bird had still not moved from its perch. Having tried everything else, the king thought to himself, “Maybe I need someone more familiar with the countryside to understand the nature of this problem.” So he cried out to his court, “Go and get a farmer.”

beautiful-falcon-flying-wallpaper-1502In the morning, the king was thrilled to see the falcon soaring high above the palace gardens. He said to his court, “Bring me the doer of this miracle.”

The court quickly located the farmer, who came and stood before the king. The king asked him, “How did you make the falcon fly?”

With his head bowed, the farmer said to the king, ” It was very easy, your highness. I simply cut the branch where the bird was sitting.”

We are all made to fly — to realize our incredible potential as human beings. But instead of doing that, we sit on our branches, clinging to the things that are familiar to us. The possibilities are endless, but for most of us, they remain undiscovered. We conform to the familiar, the comfortable, the mundane. So for the most part, our lives are mediocre instead of exciting, thrilling and fulfilling.

So let us learn to destroy the branch of fear we cling to and free ourselves to the glory of flight.

 

If you are feeling like the falcon and would like help in “cutting the branch”, we are here to help you! You can sign up for our “Dream Coaching” here:

http://www.thirumurdavidkiran.com/dream-coaching/

Alternatively, you can choose to attend one of our “Be the Hero” Events and learn how to take control of your life and make it a successful one.

http://www.thirumurdavidkiran.com/be-the-hero-of-your-own-story/

 

 

Grow Anywhere!

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It’s amazing where you can find inspiration from if you are looking for it.

A few weeks ago, I was in Mumbai. My family used to live on Madh Island when I was a baby and so I took a ferry there on a Sunday evening track down my old living place. Although I couldn’t find it, I had the chance to watch the sun set on the beach. And since I’ve always loved beach sunsets, It was an opportunity not to be missed.

On this particular beach, there was no sand, only rocks. As I was walking towards the coastline, I noticed this small plant growing up between the cracks in the rocks. Here–in the most likely place where all conditions were against it–here was growth!

No matter what the condition are like around you, don’t ever let anyone tell you that you can’t do your best to grow into your potential. You are destined for great things!

You’ll Never Guess What Tom Brady Just Did!

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Congratulations to the New England Patriots on winning the 51st Super Bowl. What makes the win so astonishing is the fact that they were down 28-3 in the third quarter of the game and came back to win it 28-34! It was a legendary game that will go down through the ages as a true example of the fact that it’s ALWAYS too early to quit.

Take a cue from Tom Brady and his boys for your personal success. Not matter what the score, no matter what the outlook,  it ain’t ever over till it’s over. You’ve just got to dig in and keep fighting–and you just might make history!

Life is a Voyage…

This is of my favorite quotes of all time. In fact. I’ve made it a mantra of mine and I advise the people who attend my “Be the Hero” events to do the same. In life, we have no control over where we were born, the way we look, our family, the place we grew up, etc. But we have absolute control over our choices and ability to use these things to have a successful life. Just because you were “born this way” (apologies to Lady Gaga) doesn’t mean that you are forever fated to remain in those same circumstances. In a meeting with the legend Brain Tracy last week, I learned that 87% of all billionaires in the world today came from poor or low middle class families. Life isn’t always about the cards you’ve been dealt. It’s how you play with them that counts. A person doesn’t have to be a victim of their circumstances. You can use your unique situation to your advantage. Don’t know how? Write me today and I’ll help you do it! Happy Sunday!

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“Reflecting on 2016” part 4: My Goals for 2017

(Note: For the past few days, I’ve been reflecting on 2016 and planning for 2017. Thank you for joining my thoughts and meditations. This is the final instalment. Hope you enjoy it!)

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Today is the final instalment of my reflecting on the year gone by and the year to come. I hope that you’ve enjoyed the journey with me so far and I pray that it has been a blessing to your life in some way. The things I’ve shared have been deep lessons that are very personal to me and it has taken a bit of courage to share them, as I generally tend to be a private person. But, as someone told me years ago when I was first starting out in my blogging, people want to see the real you. Everyone can relate to real stories of struggles, joys, and triumphs. And so I hope my time with you has helped you to not only know me better, but that it has encouraged you in some way.

Today, I am going to be tackling the final point of this series: my goals for 2017. This should be a fun one! Once again, this is in no particular order. Here I go:

 

– I want to take time to go through life slowly. I want to enjoy each and every minute of every day. I don’t want to be rushing down the street so fast that I can’t admire the sunset. I don’t want to be focusing so much on what I am going to say that I miss the beauty of listening to the person who I am communicating with. I don’t want to be so eager to reach somewhere that I miss the journey along the way. I don’t want to eat too quickly that I don’t savor the scent and the taste of the dish. I don’t want a day to go by where I don’t go slow at some point and just enjoy the simple joys of being alive.

– I want to be more grateful for each and every thing in my life–good or bad. I want to be able to go through life with a smile on my face and a praise on my lips. Sure, life plain sucks at times but it is also beautiful. I want to celebrate that.

– I want to show more love and care to the people around me. I want each person that interact with to feel genuine interest and care from me. I want every interaction that I have to have meaning and to leave someone feeling better. This, of course, will only happen if I am going slow enough to value these interactions and if I am living a life of positivity and gratefulness. It all ties in together.

– I also want to focus on my health this year. It’s been something I’ve let slide over the past few years and I can’t afford to let it slide any further. This year, I am going to focus on making myself better.

– I also want to get one of my books published this year. It’s been a goal for a few years now, but this year I will do my utmost to make it a reality.

– My final goal for 2017 is to not be afraid to step out and challenge myself to claim opportunities when they arise. I will be writing more about this in the next few weeks–please do join me for that–but I want to begin by setting the premise for a year of stepping out. I have always been a cautious person (more about this in my next blog post). I’ve let countless opportunities go by me because I deliberated them for too long. This year, I want to have the courage to chase things that I’ve been afraid to chase before. I want to look back at the end of 2017 with satisfaction and not with regret. Regret comes from knowing that we could have done something but we didn’t, or could have done something differently. This year, I want to my best to avoid that by taking chances as they come. As Celine Dion once said, “What do you say to taking chances?” This year, I want my response to be: “Amen and bring it on!”

 

Happy New Year to you all!!!

 

The Courage of a Soldier

Success is not for the faint of heart. Success is not for the pretenders. Success is not for the dabblers. Success is for those who give it their all. Success is for those who genuinely throw themselves headlong at their intended goal. Success is for those who are courageous enough to buck the tide and stand firm in the face of all obstacles. Blessed, therefore, are they who seize upon their dream and do not let go until they see it become reality. It will truly be a hard fight, but the courage of a soldier is what wins the war! Have a wonderful Friday!

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To Be an Olympian

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To Be an Olympian

By Thirumur David Kiran

 

Over the past few weeks, the Olympics has claimed the interest of the world as 11,000 athletes from 207 countries have dazzled one and all with their strength, skill, speed, endurance, mental toughness, and overall athleticism. World records have been broken, previously unattainable heights have been achieved, memories have been made, and moments have been experienced that have captured the imagination of the viewing audience and elevated their makers into instant stardom—some of them into immediate legend!

According to the statistic team of the BBC website, an estimated 3.5 billion people were engaged with the Olympics worldwide—through viewing on television or through commenting on mediums such as Facebook, Twitter, etc.

I will happily admit that I was included in that figure.

I am a massive sports fan. True, I don’t play sports all that well at the moment, but I have an avid interest in viewing sports and learning about new sports. In another life I would probably be a sports anchor or journalist. But in my present life, sports are my way of relaxing and are a big hobby for me.

As such, the Olympic Games are a very happy time for the sport’s fan in me and I generally try to adapt my schedule to be able to keep up with the major events. This year, that meant waking up two hours earlier than usual in order to watch the final events of the day. That has resulted in about 4-5 hours of sleep a night, as my days are usually quite full.  This schedule has truly deepened my relationship with the dark beauty we call coffee, and I will confess before all that my love for it has grown in manifold ways over the past few weeks.

Aside from enjoying the close races, the nail-biting finishes, the grandstand flourishes of ability, and the incredible feats of strength, I have come to have a healthy admiration for the amount of athleticism that these sportsmen and sportswomen. And it isn’t just about their rippling muscles and their incredibly toned physique. It’s their ability to run for an hour and then dig in and sprint the last lap. It’s their ability to swim at top speed day after day (sometimes two or three times a day) and still come out on top. It’s their ability to jump, flip, somersault, and twist in ways that the athletes of yesteryear could only dream of. It’s their ability to fight through pain and exhaustion to produce results. It’s their ability to have the mental grit that pushes them across the line ahead of the rest of the field.

Once in four years, these athletes have their moment in the sun. Once in four years, these athletes command the attention of the nations as they push all boundaries in search of gold. Once in four years, these athletes have a chance to become legend.

Once in four years, the world stops and admires these athletes. Once in four years, the world applauds these men and women as heroes for their feats.

However, that is not the whole story.

What people fail to realize is that it takes years and years of trying, failing, pain, agony, exhaustion, sore muscles, blood, sweat, and tears in order to produce a performance that takes them to a medal finish. What is seen on display is but a fraction.

A 100 meter dash takes under 10 seconds to complete, but years to perfect.

A vault is over in a single motion, but takes ages to master and improve.

A swim dash can finish in under a minute, but takes uncountable hours to train for.

Indeed, an Olympic performance is but a fraction—the tip of the iceberg. It is a culmination of effort, a synopsis of a lifetime of training. And while we must applaud achievement, we must not forget the hard work it took to get them there.

Michael-Phelps3Michael Phelps (31), winner of 28 medals and holder of numerous records across five Olympics, trained for eight hours a day for five straight years during his teenage years without a single day off! His workouts were considered to be inhumane and his coach was dubbed “the mad scientist” but he continued them through his career, pushing his body beyond what most people would consider as the breaking point.

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Simone Biles (19), winner of 5 medals (four gold) at Rio and highly touted as one of the greatest gymnasts of all time, grew up in a foster home and began training at age 7 as a way to escape. She trained for hours and hours for years. Even her coach told her not to train too hard, to which Simone responded, “I want to do this!”

 

mo-farah-double-double-athletics-rio-2016-olympics_3769224Mo Farah (33), winner of the 5,000m and 10,000m gold two Olympics in a row, grew up in the war-torn Mogadishu, Somalia before moving to London.           He originally had no interest in running (he wanted to play football) until his coach bribed him into it. After slacking off in the beginning, he made the decision that he wanted to be the best and then began training like no other distance runner. He went to Kenya to train with the great marathon runners, and then continued to train there over the years, even leaving his wife to go home alone after their honeymoon because he needed to get back to training. He eventually moved to the USA to continue training. He implemented crazy training techniques such as sprinting at high altitudes in order to increase lung capacity, underwater treadmills to build stamina, weight training to reduce bobbing arms, etc.

The Great Britain women’s hockey team won gold for the first time in their history at Rio.74400395-england-hockey-sport-large_trans++PjDZOdMgceQ0ik-fUDgEdn5kBUHVUPIOFeoJr9sPfNk The players in a later interview talked about the intensive training that they had undergone over the past few years. Not content with the usual training regime, the coach doubled their training exercises for the week. In addition, the coach wanted to improve their ability to think well when exhausted, so every Thursday he would have them work out till they were practically collapsing from exhaustion and then he’d make them do tests and quizzes to improve mental sharpness. It paid off, as after a gruelling final went past extra time and into penalties, they scored all of their penalties, while their opponents missed three.

These few stories are just a tiny percentage of the stories that are out there. I could have looked at any athlete from any country and found a similar story there. Indeed, just a bit of study will throw up many more examples of hard work, of training, of pushing, of fighting, of going beyond exhaustion and going beyond pain to produce their best.

Every four years, the world takes notice of crowning moments and achievements—moments and achievements that were a lifetime in the making. The incredible dash, the world record finish, the mind-blowing feat—these all are the culmination of years of hard effort.

Muhammad Ali put it best: “I hated every minute of training, but I said, ‘Don’t quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.’”

Your success too will be the result of your hard work and effort. All those nights with less sleep, all those hours spent at your desk, all those letters that you send out, all those people that you meet, all those times when you are tired, all those times that you get rejected, all those moments you feel like a failure, all those moments that you want to quit—those are what make you a champion.

One day, the world will sit back and applaud your success. And you alone will know the hundreds of hours of suffering that brought that success about. Your success will be the culmination of your effort, the synopsis of a life of dedication.

May that motivation push you through the difficulties of today. Suffer now, and live the rest of your life as a Champion!